Vika, do you remember?

Vika, I know your mom is reading this post to you right now.
So I want to say a few things.
We’ve met two years ago in Lugansk.
I remember that day–it was mid-May 2015.
You were in bed, too weak to get up. You lost your two front teeth, went blind, and weighed about as much as in elementary school. Younger brother had only just died, and people thought back then the war would be over soon. One couldn’t get insulin in the city. Pharmacies stood empty. No wages, no pensions.
Even though you were too weak to get up, you got up anyway–so said mom. One had to, even though one didn’t want to. You didn’t want anything back then–to live, to eat, to walk…
Lena told me: “talk to her, you are merry, young.”
I tried to talk, remember?
I went on about some nonsense, and you only replied that you didn’t want to live.

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Vika is smiling!

Vika is in a good state of mind for the first time in several months.
She’s better, judging by the photos.
Every time we send her medications, I’m afraid of what she’ll look like on the photos.
She’s been feeling sad more lately, beyond consolation. She wrinkles her forehead and keeps her eyes closed, hiding them.
Now she’s smiling, and I think that’s because her eyes don’t hurt her as much.
All in all, I’m even afraid to say anything.
And I miss her so.


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This should not have happened

This photo was taken three years ago, in January 2014. Vika is a round-cheeked beauty. Her brother is alive. She can still see and has no TB. There is no war, and Lugansk is lit up by fireworks, not weapons.
Sometimes my posts about Vika are read by people who have kids with diabetes, and say that it’s Vika’s own fault, that everything is due to improper sugar monitoring.
Perhaps it is her fault.
But before the war she spent her whole life with diabetes. She was a student, a lively girl, and if it weren’t for the war, she’d have graduated form the university and perhaps gotten married.
It’s awful to even think about that.
Right now, she doesn’t even know whether her eye will be removed.
She lives surrounded by hundreds of pills which periodically make her feel worse, but without which she wouldn’t survive.
Her brother had died, and she succumbed to glycemic coma several times, and her mother is afraid of leaving her by herself.

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Vika, Vika…

–And what color is it?
–Orange. Give me your hand. Can you feel it? –It unfolds.
Vika is gingerly turning the postcard in her hand, trying to feel each of its details, including the wire-pleated heart carefully laid out inside.
She has lost the last of her eyesight. All of the hopes to restore it are gone. The pain in her eye is so strong that even the several surgeries have failed to reduce the pressure. In all likelihood, her eye will be removed in near future.
Over the weekend. Vika slipped into hypoglycemic coma. At sleep, during the night. Her mom was barely able to bring her back. Now Vika is afraid to sleep…

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Thanks, everyone!

When Vika returned to Lugansk after her operation in Moscow, to be honest, we had no idea what would come next.
Upon discharge, she was prescribed a long list of antibiotics and hard-hitting TB drugs. She has to keep taking them for about a year, otherwise the surgery and the six months at the clinic will have been a waste of time. Almost none of these drugs can be obtained in Lugansk. Not only are they not dispensed at hospitals, they can’t be purchased either.
I’m at a loss for words.
On the photo below: Vika in June 2014. Before the bombardment of Lugansk.
A whole another person…


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Another Operation

Dear friends, we have not so good news concerning our Vika from Lugansk.
Recently the pressure within her eye has increased and she has been hospitalized with glaucoma.
She’s in extreme pain and is on painkillers. She was operated on yesterday, because the pain became unbearable.
Out of the good news, we collected 45 thousand rubles for medicaments, which we purchased and delivered to her already in Lugansk.


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Vika is back in Lugansk

Vika went home. To Lugansk.
After six months of treatment, including a lung surgery, she went home.
We brought Vika to Moscow to restore her eyesight, but in the process discovered TB with which she was struggling that entire time. TB was defeated, but nothing could be done about her eyes…
The process turned out to be irreversible.

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Condition: Stable

Lena and Zhenya went to visit our Vika at the hospital.
The operation was successful, which we already reported immediately after the fact.
Vika is back in her room.
She’s eating, and her condition is overall stable, so much so that she even came out to talk with our folks.
They said she’s coughing, but that’s as it should be.


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