Nothing but good news

The last two days were perfectly crazy, as we, dressed up as Grandfather Frost and Snow Maiden visited practically all of Lugansk.
By the evening we were barely standing and it seems I dreamed we visited more kids and made them read poetry.
Cars were honking at us, people were waving and nearly all the adults were excitedly conveying us New Year’s greetings.
We visited many apartments, but this post will cover only those which you already know.
The people we help, those whom you periodically see on the pages of this blog.
Here we are visiting the family of Vitaliy, a militiaman from Rubezhnoye. Vitaliy spent over a year in captivity in Ukraine. Now he, his wife, and son live in a dorm in Lugansk.

 

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Nikita is smiling

On October 18, 2016, Nikita was diagnosed with diabetes.
It is horrifying to imagine what it’s like to have your child, who has always been healthy, to be given such a diagnosis.
Nikita’s family fled from Stanitsa Luganskaya during the winter of 2015 and now lives in Lugansk. Mom was pregnant when they grabbed only their documents and ran for their lives.
The came under fire. More than once.
All of that affected the boy’s health. He stopped smiling and became apathetic, and then he started to lose consciousness. That’s how the diabetes was discovered.
I wrote about Nikita before, and now we’ve visited him in person.


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Insulin

Morning. I’m running to class. IM: “Insulin urgently needed!” I have no clue what’s happening, so I call Zhenya.
–Got a call from Nikita’s mom. She was crying. She said they went to the clinic for insulin, AND THERE IS NONE. The boy has only enough for two more days of sots.
Do you know what it means for a diabetic to be without insulin? First your blood sugar jumps, and then coma.
Over the last year, insulin situation in LPR has seemingly improved, so nobody even suspected this might happen. Two months ago the doctor said there is enough insulin in all forms, whatever you need, you’ll get. And now this.
Mom is crying because there is no insulin. NONE. Not in pharmacies, and not for any amount of money. How this happened is another question. I’ve been getting such news from various parts of LPR. Nobody knows when it will become available. The boy can’t use just any kind, because otherwise we could have obtained something in Lugansk.
I finish my lecture and then I hurry to call everyone.
–Les’, will you buy? I can’t manage myself, but I’ll send you money!
Money is transferred, insulin procured. Lesya helps out once again, but it soon turns out she can’t take it to the Donbass.


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