Oksana

Oksana was one of those girls who back then, in 2014, were in the first ranks of Donbass independence defenders.
Her house remained on the other side. In Ukraine, in Kramatorsk…
The girl fought, participated in the liberation of Chernukhino. Blew up on a mine with her vehicle. The driver was torn to bits, another soldier lost an arm. She suffered a spine injury. She was taken to Rostov for surgery, had plates inserted.
Now she lives in Lugansk. Her house is where charges for “terrorism” and “separatism” are awaiting her. Her mother was held prisoner in a cellar for three days, after she tried to recreate her daughter’s documents and send them to her…


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Wheelchair Needed

We haven’t written about Seryozha a lot lately, he usually gets a mention in the general reports.
Lena is trying to visit him as often as possible in the retirement home in Lugansk.
Seryozha is sad. He’s had problems before the war, but the amputation of his leg in ’15 broke his life.
We already wrote last year he finds it difficult to be alone and confined to a wheelchair. He’s not strong enough to roll up the ramp into the home. He has polyarthritis, after all. So he can’t traverse any obstacles without help. And yet there’s a lovely forest park right next door.
He’s very sad and asks about us and Zhenya all the time.

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President Putin recognizes LDPR passports

This news has been reverberating for days.
But I didn’t at first understand what this was about.
Because LPR and DPR passports have had de-facto recognition for at least a year.
What does it mean?
As far as I understand, juridical recognition means that you can be admitted into a country that recognizes the document’s validity. Which means the customs will let you through the border.
About a year ago, in the spring, we were helping a woman from Stakhanov get into a hospital in Moscow. She had an LPR passport. She crossed the border with no trouble, and no institution anywhere rejected her passport as an official document. I even remember that the doctor, upon seeing her passport, smiled and summoned his colleagues to have a look–see, these are the passports LPR is issuing. This was in Moscow.

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