Greetings from Seryozha

I haven’t written about Seryozha for a long time. And I should have.
Three years ago, he was always “Sergey Vladimirovich”, and I always addressed him very formally.
Yes, it’s really been three years, we met him in April of 2015, in Khryashchevatoye. He was walking on a crutch wrapped in duct tape. In a barrack where he lived after his home was destroyed by artillery fire there was no water or electricity. The whole village, which was nearly flattened during the summer of 2014, did not have electricity or water for about a year.
After we left him back then, in April, he fell and broke his leg three weeks later. He spent a whole day on the ground–his phone was dead, nobody could hear him screaming. Eventually an ambulance picked him up but it was too late to save his leg. But he survived, even though his life was hinging by a thread. Seryozha has polyarthritis, and he finds it difficult to walk. It’s a miracle we met, otherwise we would not have been able to help him.

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Maybe I’ll tell you about Seryozha?

Stories Seryozha are simply stories about a distant uncle. Perhaps that’s why I’ve written fewer and fewer stories about him. Some stories are not suitable for public consumption, others have been written so many times it’s becoming awkward. Seryozha Kutsenko probably got the biggest chapter in my “People Live Here” book.
So, how’s Seryozha?
Seryozha is sad and is very bored in the retirement home. Even though one can’t call it an ordinary retirement home.
Beautiful trails, benches, bridges, all fixed up, great food, but…

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Bringing “ours” greetings

Shortly everyone will be greeting women on the occasion of March 8, the International Women’s Day, and I’m still writing about we, on February 23, brought greetings to people under our are. But it’s better late then never, right?
You know, February 23, May 9, those are days when people OVER THERE are so happy that we can’t even imagine.
Over there–in LPR. Over there–in Novorossia. Over there–where there’s war. Where people have been living on top a volcano for 4 years already.
This day is unbelievably important to the Donbass people.
We brought greetings to the men under our care with what many internet users think foolish, ironic, but to them important little things. Not everyone can always afford to buy shaving cream or deodorant.

Seryozha…Seryozha was a tank commander and served near Moscow. Once upon a time he was Ukraine’s boxing champion.
Now he’s disabled–he’s lost a leg, he has polyarthritis. He lives in a retirement home. His house in Khryashchevatoye is gone, it was bombed out during the summer of ’14.
But you know Seryozha!!))) Our Seryozha!
If not, please click on the Kutsenko tag at the bottom of the article.

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Nothing but good news

The last two days were perfectly crazy, as we, dressed up as Grandfather Frost and Snow Maiden visited practically all of Lugansk.
By the evening we were barely standing and it seems I dreamed we visited more kids and made them read poetry.
Cars were honking at us, people were waving and nearly all the adults were excitedly conveying us New Year’s greetings.
We visited many apartments, but this post will cover only those which you already know.
The people we help, those whom you periodically see on the pages of this blog.
Here we are visiting the family of Vitaliy, a militiaman from Rubezhnoye. Vitaliy spent over a year in captivity in Ukraine. Now he, his wife, and son live in a dorm in Lugansk.

 

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Tank

“Guys, thanks for the tank!”
That’s the message I recently got from our Seryozha Kutsenko.
He’s been traveling since morning till the evening, up and down all kinds of ramps and trails.
What can I say–last year, he’s been outside only a few times between October and end of April. Ramps are so steep that he couldn’t ascend them on his own. He’s embarrassed to ask the nurses, and they are not always available anyway.


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Sergeant Kutsenko, hit the road!

Perhaps I should tell you about the main reason for this trip to Lugansk?
Here’s what happened.
One evening, when I was already falling asleep, I got a letter from Natasha. Her profile photo shows an unbelievably beautiful blonde–I had no idea. “Dunya, tell me, how are things with the wheelchair for Seryozha Kutsenko?”  How are things? They are nowhere. It’s expensive, I say. Electric ones are like that. Can’t collect enough money.
“Maybe I’ll buy one?”
And things took off.
We started with looking at a used, cheap one, and ended with a cool German brand new one that’s insanely expensive.
This lovely lady totally stunned me, and on top of that keeps saying there’s no need to write about it. Yeah right, Natasha. I’ll post the best photo right here. Let others envy me.
All in all, we managed to get it by Seryozha’s birthday (actually a couple of days later) and went to surprise him.


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“It’s me, Seryozha, don’t be afraid!”

“Hello, Dunyasha! It’s me, Seryozha, don’t be afraid! Private Kutsenko!”
I was so stunned by the call that I fell silent for several seconds, forcing Seryozha to explain who was calling. But I recognized him right away.
–Seryozha, good to hear from you!
–Indeed!
It turned out he also called our Moscow Zhenya. He spent most of his pension, half of which goes to the retirement home, on calling us.
How he misses us, and how sad he is when we leave him…

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Wheelchair Needed

We haven’t written about Seryozha a lot lately, he usually gets a mention in the general reports.
Lena is trying to visit him as often as possible in the retirement home in Lugansk.
Seryozha is sad. He’s had problems before the war, but the amputation of his leg in ’15 broke his life.
We already wrote last year he finds it difficult to be alone and confined to a wheelchair. He’s not strong enough to roll up the ramp into the home. He has polyarthritis, after all. So he can’t traverse any obstacles without help. And yet there’s a lovely forest park right next door.
He’s very sad and asks about us and Zhenya all the time.

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Private Kutsenko

Seryozha is doing fine.
Time has stopped at the Retirement Home. It flows slowly, unhurriedly.
How does one explain Seryozha to new readers?
We met him 1.5 years ago in Khryashchevatoye which was nearly completely bombed out by the UAF and NatsGvardia. Streets were in ruins. Houses were in ruins.
We ran into him by accident. And, by the will of fates, we saved his life.
That’s how it turned out. Read here.
Seryozha lost his leg, his home. But still had polyarthritis.
That’s it in a nutshell, but only a tiny part of who Seryozha is and what he means to us…


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Seryozha’s Day

Seryozha and I are both Scorpios )
I was not the only one to celebrate my birthday recently.
The guys caught up with our Kutsenko in the retirement home hallway.
It so happens Zhenya and Lena were still in hospital on his birthday so could not convey birthday greetings on that day.
But they arrived without warning later, found him, and surprised him with a huge cake with candles, and with presents.
Aren’t they great?
I still see Zhenya’s sly smile and Lena’s concentration at lighting the candles )))
And, of course, our Seryozha keeping our guys away from home )))


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